Tag Archives: CAD/CAM orthotics

Mid-Season Junior Football Injuries

Now that we are well and truly into the winter sport season our young sporting stars may be complaining of some aches and pains. Due to the nature of football codes it is not uncommon for our kids to suffer from foot, ankle and leg injuries at this time of the season.

These injuries may range from a bump or a bruise, sprained ankle or something a bit more serious like a fracture. Participating in sport should be an enjoyable experience and therefore attending to pain and injury is essential to ensure our children continue to enjoy their sport.

Inversion Ankle Sprain

The most common injury suffered across all the football codes would have to be an inversion ankle sprain.  An inversion ankle sprain occurs when the ankle rolls and is twisted inwards overstretching and damaging the ligaments on the outside of the ankle. The severity of the injury can vary greatly. In minor sprains this can consist of damage to a few ligament fibres resulting in a small amount of pain and swelling around the ankle. In the most severe cases, rupture of the ankle ligaments and damage to the bone can occur. Severe injuries involving rupture or minor fracture usually result in severe pain, swelling, bruising and often an inability to put weight on the foot.

Initial treatment should follow the regime of rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE).  Depending on the severity of the injury, crutches, ankle braces or cast walkers may be required to offload and support the ankle.  Poorly treated ankle sprains will often result in a recurrence of the injury and consequently a weakness and instability placing the player at an increased risk of further injury therefore a visit to your local podiatrist is recommended to ensure a proper treatment plan is initiated.

Severs Disorder

As a podiatrist heel pain is one of the most frequent problems to walk or hobble through the door.  Active children aged between 8 and 13 are particularly susceptible to heel pain or as we call it Severs disorder. This problem is caused by inflammation around the growth plate on the back of the calcaneus or heel bone where the Achilles tendon attaches. As the child grows the calf muscles and the Achilles tendon will often tighten up resulting in increased pulling on the back of the heel and growth plate resulting in inflammation and pain. This problem responds particularly well to treatment which usually involves stretches for the calf muscles, ice on the area and innersoles or orthotics to help elevate and stabilise the heel to reduce tension around the growth plate.

Shin Splints And Arch Pain

Shin pain (shin splints) and arch pain also top the list as the more common complaints we see in active kids.  These two problems can often come on gradually, starting as a mild ache during sport progressing to become a constant problem, impairing the child’s ability to participate in sport. Some kids will be more prone to these problems and this type of pain can often indicate that their feet and legs are not coping with the extra stress and strain that their sport places on them. Kids who have really flexible flat feet or feet that over pronate (roll in) are most at risk of these problems.  This is because the muscles that run up the inside and front of the shin bone and the along the underside of the arch work extra hard to keep the feet and legs stable and prevent them from rolling in and flattening out too much.

These Problems Are Treatable

The good news is that these problems are treatable and should not prevent our future footy stars from running around the park.

We recommend a check-up with a podiatrist when:

• Your child complains of recurrent pain in the feet and or legs.

• Your child is constantly tripping or falling.

• You notice any skin rashes, hard skin lumps or bumps on your child’s feet.

• Or if you have any other concerns about your child’s feet.

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Paediatric Lateral Foot Pain – Is It Iselin’s?

Children often complain of aches and pain that settle with little more than rest. However, if you child is suffering from acute pain, or general soreness that last more than 5 days it is wise to have this checked out by a Podiatrist.

Children complaining of pain on the outside of the foot may have a condition known as Iselin’s disease/syndrome. Below is a summary of this often misdiagnosed condition.

Generally children suffering from Iselin’s syndrome will report pain on the outer boarder of the foot, at the prominence known as the styloid process. Some redness and swelling over the area will be present. Barefoot activity, jumping sports and narrow fitting footwear can be aggravating factors. Individual biomechanical factors need to be assessed and treated, as splaying of the forefoot associated with flat feet, and walking on the outside of the feet with high arched/inverted feet are associated with Iselin’s disease.

It has been reported rarely, but is probably more common than appreciated. Clinically it can be confused with tendonitis, ankle sprains, fractures of the 5th metatarsal or even labeled as  growing pains. It appears to be more common in athletically active, older children and adolescents, and more common in males. Early recognition and treatment may prevent long-term complications such as non-union and subsequent pain.

Early treatment often consists of conservative measures – rest, ice, padding, footwear, orthotics, stretching, massage of peroneals, etc. Delayed intervention can lead to continued stress through the fusion of the secondary ossification centre and even non-union. Non-union is usually very painful, and may require surgical excision of the proximal epiphysis or open reduction internal fixation with an orthopaedic screw.

See my FootDr’s website.

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Queensland Bulls use Podiatry to Ensure Peak Performance

my FootDr - Podiatrist for the Queensland BullsThe Queensland Bulls cricket team is already well into their preseason training and are hot favourites to retain the Sheffield Shield in the 2012-13 summer. So too the Brisbane Heat, who despite just falling short of the making the Big Bash finals last year are expecting big things this coming December and January. The squad welcomes back Nathan Hauritz after 6 years playing in Sydney and Usman Khawaja, the exciting left-handed opening batsman has also made the move north inspired by the unique coaching style of Darren ‘Boof” Lehmann. The squad is also bolstered by a number of emerging junior players and a solid list of experienced campaigners including captain James Hopes and veteran wicketkeeper Chris Hartley.

The Bulls squad in preparation for the compacted season ahead undergo a number of medical and fitness assessments and tests. Just like the rest of us, peak foot health is critical for optimal performance and comfort while on the field. Serious and debilitating foot and leg conditions commonly experienced by cricketers include stress fractures, tendonitis, sprains and strains, spurs, joint impingement and contusions. Fast bowlers in particular, can also suffer less serious but equally uncomfortable blisters, calluses and corns, bruised and broken toenails, and even open heel fissures (deep cracks).

my FootDr podiatrists and directors Darren Stewart and Greg Dower have been involved with Queensland Cricket for the past season and were yesterday invited to assess the squad and provide necessary treatment. The assessment of each player involved a thorough history, assessment of their joint and muscle range of movement, postural review, detailed gait assessment both relaxed walking and also the specifics of their playing mechanics, high definition peak pressure mat readings, and a 3D foot profile scan of their feet.

Each player will be provided with highly customised foot orthoses to improve comfort, optimise shoe fit, equalise pressure and overall assist in alignment and efficiency of the feet and legs. Some players have leg length discrepancies, a common anatomical variation, and benefit from having a raise inserted in the sole of the shoe to balance the pelvis and assist in spinal alignment. Both Darren and Greg will be in regular contact with the team physiotherapist and Queensland Bulls legend Martin Love during the season, and attend recovery sessions to provide onsite treatment and advice to the team.

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Sore feet and legs after the Bridge to Brisbane?

my FootDr podiatry Bridge to Brisbane Team

my FootDr podiatry Bridge to Brisbane Team

Were you one of the 40 000 plus Queenslanders who braved the early morning chill to climb the Sir Leo Hielscher bridge and walk or run your way to the RNA showgrounds? This was the 4th time my 11 year old daughter and I have participated, and we love the exercise and carnival atmosphere of one of the Australia’s largest fun runs. We walk and jog the course, enjoy the scenery and make a mad dash for the line to try and improve on last year’s time!

Being a podiatrist, it’s an occupational hazard walking alongside such a large pack of people; I can’t help but to observe the variety or different walking and running styles, choice of footwear to participate in and how people cope with the gradual fatigue that can set in. I suppose in many ways this is a perfect cross section of our community, with elite runners up the front slogging it out for a podium finish, recreational runners just behind and then the weekend hackers (me included) making up the pack.

It amazes me that so many people may not be aware of how their foot and leg biomechanics affect their body’s overall function. So common amongst the participants was some characteristics, that after pointing out to my daughter a few cases of quite profound excessive pronation (the most common form of foot dysfunction, where the ankle leans inwards and the arch of the foot flattens when standing and walking) she started to point them out to me!

my FootDr podiatry Bridge to Brisbane

my FootDr podiatry Bridge to Brisbane

Every day in clinic I assist people recover from biomechanical related foot, leg and hip/back – sometime it can take months to return to normal activities following an overuse injury such as:

  • Plantar fasciitis (pain on the heel or arch)
  • Shin splints (pain typically on the inner shin, but this term encompasses all shin pain)
  • Achilles tendonitis (either at the back of the heel bone or just above)
  • Stress fractures (bone fatigue that leads to a partial break – commonly metatarsal of the forefoot)
  • Anterior knee pain (around or to the side of the knee cap)

Almost all of these conditions can be avoided with awareness of the biomechanical dysfunction and appropriate advice and treatment if necessary. Even being recommended the right type of shoe may be beneficial in some cases.

For those that would like to see what excessive foot pronation looks like check out the following link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQ83QrPKKMU

If you’re feeling more than just muscle fatigue today, or suffer from one of the conditions above you should have your lower limb biomechanics investigated with video gait analysis. A podiatrist competent in assessing and managing sports injuries will then be able to provide you with the advice you need to ensure you run faster next year!

Darren Stewart – Podiatrist (my FootDr podiatry centres)

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my FootDr podiatry and the Steady Steps Program

Podiatrists Darren Stewart recently presented to a group of south side locals on the importance of good foot health and footwear as part of the Steady Steps Program. Margaret Coates, Physiotherapist and Tai Chi instructor runs the Steady Steps program to improve the awareness of people of that factors that influence balance and provide advice which can reduce the incidence of falls.

Falls prevention is a critical issue for our aging population, as one incident of a fall can lead to a loss of confidence and independence, or even a serious fracture or head trauma resulting in hospitalisation. General factors include reduced muscle strength, slowed reflexes, vision impairment, altered cognitive function as well as pain associated with arthritis and other medical conditions.

my FootDr podiatry centres - Steady Steps Program

Darren Stewart with Margaret Coates, drawing the winner the my FootDr podiatry prize from attendees of the seminar (prize includes a 1 hours comprehensive consultation and free New Balance shoes)

“The feet also play a huge role in balance and therefore falls prevention. Foot pain of any type has been identified as a key factor in falls – so that includes everything from a painful corn or callus, right through to tendonitis, heel spurs and bunions. Furthermore, inadequate, inappropriate or ill fitting footwear can greatly decrease an individual’s ability to balance. If you’re not sure if your shoes are right, or you have suffered for foot and leg pain lasting more than a week, get yourself off to a podiatrist ASAP” said Stewart.

For more information on the Steady Steps Program or foot related issues please contact any of the my FootDr podiatry centres.

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Heel Pain in Children

With football and netball season well underway, podiatry clinics around the country will see an influx in children suffering from heel pain. Whilst there are a number of possible causes for these symptoms, the majority of these children are suffering from a condition known as Severs Disease, or as I prefer to call it, Severs Syndrome. Typically this affects girls between the age of 7-12 and boys from 9-15, involved in regular physical activity.

Symptoms include pain at the back of the heel bone near to the insertion of the Achilles tendon which can be present constantly, during, or immediately after playing sport. The most common sports that aggravate these symptoms include soccer, AFL, basketball, netball, athletics and other sports that involve explosive movements like sprinting and jumping.

Severs Syndrome is described as a tractional apophysitis. Traction refers to pulling, and apophysitis relates to inflammation of a growth plate. In Severs Syndrome it is the Achilles tendon that applies the traction on the juvenile heel bone, and the growth plate is irritated by a sheering stress due to one of a number of biomechanical imbalances.

A clinical assessment by a knowledgeable podiatrist is often all that is required to diagnose this condition, although in rare cases where disproportionate pain or swelling is present it may necessitate an x-ray referral directly from your podiatrist. A typical consultation will involve a thorough history of the symptoms and aggravating activity, a review of footwear, physical assessment including joint range of motion and muscle testing, and video gait analysis.

Generally children suffering from Severs Syndrome fit into one of two physical categories;

Mesomorph – Solidly built with strong and inflexible muscles. In this case there is insufficient flexibility at the ankle joint.

Ectomorph – Supple flexible joints result in excessive collapse of the arch of the foot (pronation) when standing or running, which in turn results in a delay in the natural timing of heel lift.

With a skilful assessment of the cause and correct diagnosis, effective treatment in almost all cases is possible. The earlier a correct diagnosis is made and treatment initiated, the less likely the child will require rest from activity. my FootDr Podiatry Centres successfully treat 1000’s of children suffering from heel pain every year.

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My FootDr Sponsors Mining Event with Darren Lockyer

my FootDr Podiatry Centres, with One Key Resources, were proud to bring Rugby League immortal Darren Lockyer to Dysart in Central Queensland for a two day event, starting with a Gala dinner last night. The evening was a fantastic opportunity for mining industry colleagues and related businesses to touch base, and hear the career stories of the great Darren Lockyer and team mate and media personality Ben Ikin.

Today Locky and the my FootDr team will be visiting the local Dysart football club and engaging with the local community. Podiatry services are in great demand throughout the Bowen Basin, with active local communities and the huge expansion in coal mining projects. my Foot Dr podiatry centres is strategically located in both Mackay and extensively around south east Queensland to provide both onsite and offsite podiatry care. ‘With the increase in mining personnel, we are seeing a huge demand for custom orthotics, footwear and specifically safety boot advice, and general foot care in our Mackay podiatry centre. Many of these people are working long shifts, on hard and uneven surfaces, which dramatically increases the prevalence of sprains and strains, heel and leg pain as well as lower back pain”, said Chris Watson, Podiatrist for my FootDr at Mackay.

Just like the great Darren Lockyer, everybody needs a little help to perform at their best. ‘People suffering from little aches and niggles in their feet, legs or back should consult a podiatrist before the problem increases and leads to time off work and significant pain” said Watson.

Appointments with a qualified occupational podiatrist can be made at any one of our centres by calling 1800 FOOT DR, and businesses interested in proactively managing foot complication in the work place should contact Paul Wigzell, Business Development Manager on the same number.

my FootDr Mining Occupational Podiatry Darren Lockyer

From left: Grant Wechsel (One Key Director), Paul Wigzell (my FootDr), Darren Lockyer (Legend), Chris Watson (my FootDr Mackay), Ben Ikin

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Walking Your Way To A Healthy Heart

Exercise – in particular walking – plays a key role in building and maintaining a healthy heart. As you clock up the kilometres walked it is critical that your feet are healthy and your shoes provide the right support.

Your local my FootDr podiatrist can offer a biomechanical assessment prior to you commencing exercise, along with an assessment of your footwear.

State-of-the-art my FootDr clinics use the latest high tech equipment to diagnose and treat any problems found in your feet or legs – from corn calluses, ingrown toenails to more serious issues such as peripheral vascular disease which affects 14 percent of the population and is a marker for heart attack.

Podiatrists at my FootDr work closely with general practitioners who can refer patients with chronic conditions such as heart problems for a podiatric assessment under the Medicare scheme.

The health of your feet is a key indicator of a person’s overall health with the foot described as being a mirror of systemic disease. If you have a health issue, it will often appear in the lower extremities first, so your podiatrist is your first line of detection.

Some tips to get you moving this summer:

·         Join a walking group

·         Make sure you replace your shoes when required

·         Visit a podiatrist to check your foot and lower limb mechanics are sound before engaging in exercise

Remember, if your feet, legs or your back hurts during or after exercise don’t put up with the pain. Seek help as the benefits of exercise for your heart and overall health are numerous.

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my FootDr podiatry centres Mackay

my FootDr podiatry centres brings the most advanced technology in foot care to Mackay. Located near the AFS Pharmacy in the Fourways Plaza, we acquired this practice from Proarch Podiatry in October 2011 and have retained the services of Zoe and the local team who previously were employed by Proarch Podiatry.

my FootDr podiatry Mackay is equipped with advanced gait analysis technology, the Orthema CAD/CAM Foot Orthotic Fabrication system to create soft, full length orthotics, the revolutionary PinPointe FootLaser and advanced Diabetic foot screening.

my FootDr is the only podiatrist in Mackay to bulk bill TCA (Team Care Arrangements) referrals from your doctor. We have HICAPS facilities onsite for on the spot claims from your health funds as well.

my FootDr podiatry are specialists in Occupational Podiatry , workplace and employee assessments and footwear advice and fitting. Workcover referrals are welcome.

With over 250, 000 satisfied customers, come and see us and Walk Pain Free !

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